Jill Fischer, Psy.D

The decision to seek help from a mental health professional is not an easy one. If you’ve never been in therapy before, you likely have no idea what to expect, and you may worry that you’ll be judged, criticized, or labeled as “crazy.” If you have been to therapy before, the thought of “starting all over” with someone new can also be overwhelming, especially if your previous experiences haven’t been very helpful. 

Whether you’re a therapy veteran or a newbie, I believe I can help. Because I believe that therapy is not a “one size fits all” endeavor, I will listen to what you want to get out of therapy so that I can use my expertise to guide you in a way that fits your unique needs and circumstances. As a licensed Clinical Psychologist, I use scientifically-proven techniques to help you develop the concrete skills you need to get the results you want. In addition, I use an active, direct, and non-judgmental approach to help you gain insight into the ways you may be unintentionally limiting yourself. 

I received my doctorate in Clinical Psychology at The Wright Institute in Berkeley, California, and I received my Bachelor of Arts degrees in Psychology and Music from the University of California at Santa Barbara. In addition, I am currently a member of the American Psychological Association.

Couples & Relationship Issues

Our relationships with others are critically important to our overall well-being. We are social beings and need social support, and when our primary relationships are unhealthy, it can take a serious toll on our mental and physical health. I see couples in every stage of a relationship, whether it's to improve the quality of their relationship, decide if they are right for each other, or separate in a healthy way.

 

  • Relationship/Marriage Counseling

  • Separation/Divorce Counseling

  • Premarital Counseling

  • Counseling After an Affair

  • Communications Skills Training

  • Assertiveness Training

 

Grief & Loss Issues

Losing a loved one can be incredibly painful. Furthermore, certain kinds of grief, such as suicide or homicide bereavement, can create additional difficult feelings such as guilt or anger or can reduce the amount of support available from others. You can also feel grief over other types of major losses, such as divorce or the loss of physical functioning. Regardless of the circumstances surrounding the loss, therapy can often help people move through the grieving process, especially if they feel "stuck" in their grief and unable to move on.

 

  • Grief Therapy

  • Complicated Grief

  • Suicide, Homicide, or Other Traumatic Bereavement

  • Loss of a Child

  • Anticipatory Grief

  • Caregiver Issues

Stress & Anxiety

Everyone experiences stress, but when your stress level starts to affect other parts of your life, such as your physical health, your sleep, or your relationships, it may be time to seek help. In addition, the line between being "stressed" and having an anxiety disorder can sometimes be blurry, and it can often be helpful to be evaluated by a trained professional in order to better understand what you're going through, and - most importantly - how to get some relief.

  • Stress Management 

  • Relaxation Training 

  • Chronic Worry

  • Obsessive Thinking 

  • Performance or Test Anxiety